Child Trafficking Statistics

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Child Trafficking Statistics

 

The One-Child Policy has led to a burgeoning black market in stolen children, at least 70,000 a year.[i]

 

New evidence has arisen that Chinese officials have begun stealing babies and children to sell for foreign adoption.[ii]

 

Kidnapping and buying and selling children for adoption increased over the past several years, particularly in poor rural areas. There were no reliable estimates of the number of children kidnapped; however, according to media reports, as many as 20,000 children were kidnapped every year for illegal adoption.[iii]

 

Most children kidnapped internally were sold to couples unable to have children, particularly sons.[iv]

 

The Chinese government’s restrictive family planning policies have contributed in part to what a November 2011 Global Times article referred to as China’s ‘‘massive and lucrative baby market.’’  In some cases, family planning officials reportedly have coerced parents to relinquish their children born in excess of their parents’ birth quotas, later making a profit when transferring the children into the care of local orphanages.  In other cases, individuals have abducted or purchased children for the purpose of subsequently selling them into domestic or international adoption or forced labor situations.[v]

 

China's skewed sex ratio (118 boys to 100 girls) serves as a key source of demand for the trafficking of foreign women as brides for Chinese men and forced prostitution.[vi]

 



[i] “China’s Stolen Children,” ABC Reporter, Channel 4, broadcast, April 24, 2008. See also, Fan, Maureen. “A Desperate Search for Stolen Children.” Washington Post Foreign Service. March 10, 2008, Page A11; Genzlinger, Neil. “Sold by the Thousands, Thanks to a One-Child Policy.” The New York Times. July 14, 2008; United States Department of State 2008 Human Rights Report: China (Released February 25, 2009) (“Kidnapping and the buying and selling of children for adoption increased over the past several years, particularly in poor rural areas.”)

[ii] Demick, Barbara. “Chinese babies stolen by officials for foreign adoption.” Los Angeles Times. [Online] September 20, 2009.

[iii] U.S. State Department, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, “Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2012: China,” 2012, http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/humanrightsreport/index.htm#wrapper

[iv] U.S. State Department, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, “Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2012: China,” 2012, http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/humanrightsreport/index.htm#wrapper

[v] U.S. Congressional-Executive Commission on China, Annual Report 2012, pg. 94-95 http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CHRG-112shrg76190/pdf/CHRG-112shrg76190.pdf

[vi] U.S. State Department Trafficking in Persons Report 2013 http://www.state.gov/j/tip/rls/tiprpt/2013/index.htm
 

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