The Red Sea: “China Silk Screens/Missing Chinese Baby Girls” by Lois Andersen

Summary

My hope is that through a visually stunning presentation, viewers will experience a visceral sense of loss and understanding of gendercide in China. The intent is to unambiguously represent this tragedy; leading to awareness, compassion and engagement. 

As people walk around and/or though the the exhibit, they will be engaged by winsome images. Each of the 6 silk panels will be divided into 9” squares by rows of fine stitching and will be 6 squares high by 3 squares wide, with one cut-out square missing/vacant out of every six. The images/faces will be drawn on the silk from photos of real, individual Chinese baby girls, and will be as clearly visible on the reverse.

The screen/model  you see in the photos is a rough approximation of my full idea. The actual frames of the screens are to be made of bamboo, with panels of red silk (budget permitting)or silk-like cloth. The (6) frames will be approximately 6’ high and 32”wide, with silk panels suspended between bamboo dowels, which fit into the large, vertical supporting bamboo poles. 

Each of the frames are to be lashed together with cord or slices of bamboo to keep a consistent theme of genuine Chinese materials. All parts could disassemble for relocating the exhibit. Also, panels can be organized three in one section, separate from the other three, depending on the space, traffic flow, etc.. Together they can be arranged in half circles, or at angles, depending on the visual impact in a particular space. Varying arrangements of the “screen” will allow viewers many ways to walk around and engage with the project. 

If I am granted award money, I will use it to construct the exhibit with quality materials (from 3 to 6 panels; depending on what funds provide).  

 

Bio

I am a Boston area painter/illustrator/educator http://loisandersenfineart.com/. As a Christian and blessed by God’s mercy, I am required to cry for justice for the oppressed. The challenge of the Red Sea Project prompted me to think imaginatively what sort of visual art might create awareness of gendercide in China and galvanize a response of engagement. 

 



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