Annual Reports from the Congressional-Executive Commission on China

 

Much of the research of All Girls Allowed has been supplemented by the excellent work of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China.

 

The Congressional-Executive Commission on China is a bipartisan organization dedicated to providing reliable research about China.  To view the most recent Annual Reports, please visit the following links:

 

2012 Annual Report:  http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CHRG-112shrg76190/pdf/CHRG-112shrg76190.pdf

 

2011 Annual Report:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/congress/china-cecc-rept-2011.pdf

 

2010 Annual Report:  http://www.cecc.gov/pages/annualRpt/annualRpt10/CECCannRpt2010.pdf

 

2009 Annual Report:  http://www.cecc.gov/pages/annualRpt/annualRpt09/CECCannRpt2009.pdf

 

2008 Annual Report:  http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=110_house_hearings&docid=f:45233.pdf


 

by Kat Lewis, All Girls Allowed




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“I am only one, but still I am one.

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